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Arranging the pictures

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  • Dressing 17

    1978

    Graphite pencil on paper

    14 x 12.7

  • Dressing 21

    1978

    Graphite pencil on paper

    19 x 9

  • Dressing 23

    1978

    Graphite pencil on paper

    18 x 14.5

  • Dressing 24

    1978

    Graphite pencil on paper

    18 x 14.5

  • Dressing at Night

    1979

    Graphite pencil on paper

    16 x 15

  • Dressing at Night 9

    1979

    Graphite pencil on paper

    16 x 15

  • Dressing at Night 11

    1979

    Graphite pencil on paper

    16 x 13

  • Dressing at Night 12

    1979

    Graphite pencil on paper

    16.3 x 15

  • Dressing 25

    1979

    Graphite pencil on paper

    12.7 x 12.5

  • Dressing 26

    1979

    Graphite pencil on paper

    15.5 x 12.7

  • Dressing 27

    1979

    Graphite pencil on paper

    12.7 x 17

  • Hunched Figure

    1979

    Graphite pencil on paper

    15 x 18

  • Hunched Figure 2

    1979

    Graphite pencil on paper

    15 x 14

  • On the Bed

    1979

    Graphite pencil on paper

    13.2 x 15.2

  • Passage of Arms

    1979

    Graphite pencil on paper

    21.9 x 25.1

  • Stripped Torso 1

    1979

    Graphite pencil on paper

    22.6 x 13.9

  • Bathers with Towels

    1980

    Graphite pencil on paper

    17.1 x 15.2

  • Bathers with Towels 2

    1980

    Graphite pencil on paper

    17.1 x 15.2

  • Bathers with Towels 3

    1980

    Graphite pencil on paper

    21.9 x 25.1

  • Man Lying Back

    1980

    Graphite pencil on paper

    20.3 x 14

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6

Tonal Nudes

These drawings owe much to my enthusiasm for the drawings of Seurat and Schiele. Seurat I admire for his treatment of negative space - the areas around his figures have almost as much energy as the figures themselves. Schiele I admire for his erotic power, graphic perfection and infallible sense of design - particularly in his later drawings.

My figures are invariably caught on the move or in transition - I am fascinated by the subtle interactions of muscle, bone and sinew that come into play as a body moves. A half turn, a shift of balance, sometimes just an intention to move can animate an entire figure. As this shows up most clearly and dramatically in male anatomy, most of my figures are male.

The ordinary actions of every day present endless pictorial potential. Quite unconsciously, a man makes wonderful shapes in the course of pulling on a T-shirt, stepping into a pair of trousers or towelling himself dry after bathing. These shapes often suggest the urgency of sport or the measured grace of dance and every now and again, bring to mind the posture of a memorable figure from a great work of art. With these references in mind, even the most routine activity acquires resonance.

© Michael Leonard